May 8, 2008


Description

    Houston has deep roots in energy, with almost 50% of its economy driven by the energy sector.  The 20th century was dominated by fossil fuels, particularly hydrocarbons after World War II.  Hydrocarbons were cheap, making it difficult for other energy sources to compete {except for the price aberrations from 1973 to 1985 stimulated by the oil Arab embargo}.  The collapse in energy prices brought on rough economic times for Houston in the late 1980's; but in the process, its role in oil & gas grew even stronger.

   The 21st century begins with an energy phase change driven by the enormous demand growth in energy, in particular from China and India.  This is coupled with geopolitical concerns around the Middle East and the tightness in crude oil supply that has given rise to energy security issues. On top of that, carbon based fuels are under global pressure due to fears of the repercussions of global warming. These new dynamics have brought on higher energy prices that appear sustainable with expectations of energy demand doubling by 2050.

Houston faces the need to intelligently adapt to the changing energy landscape.  Other cities like Detroit, Pittsburg, Tulsa, and New York have struggled through the economic and social quagmire of responding too slowly to changes in their main economic base.  The Houston region and the state of Texas are responding. The Greater Houston Partnership has built an Energy Collaborative with the expressed purpose of perpetuating Houston as the Energy Capital. 
 
One of the major thrusts is to expand the energy portfolio with a significant push today toward becoming a powerhouse in wind, where Texas has distinct advantages and the economics have become compelling.  Developing the next generation energy workforce is another primary goal, recognizing that the energy industry will migrate to other areas that provide the necessary skill capabilities, if they are not available in the home front. Finally, Houston must demonstrate its leadership around energy issues, including the ability to develop community best practices.

This mantra of becoming the energy capital of the future must be imbedded in Houston’s core institutions, particularly educational and research centers of excellence. Both Rice University and the University of Houston are embracing this 21st century calling. Through a cluster approach of leveraging industry, universities, the public sector, and the economic development organizations, Houston can leverage and transform its 20th century leadership in oil & gas to become the Energy Capital of the world during the 21st century.


 MENU:
            Pasta salad
            Meat loaf (beef)
            Fresh fruit sherbert
 
NOTE: If you require a special meal (vegetarian, diabetic, religious, etc), please inform us at the time of registration so we can notify the Petroleum Club in advance of the meeting.  Waiting until arrival at the Petroleum Club to ask for a special meal will result in an additional $5 charge.
Thanks for your cooperation!
 
               


Featured Speakers

Speaker: LANE SLOAN
Speaker LANE SLOAN
Greater Houston Partnership   Lane Sloan is currently the Vice-chairman of the Greater Houston Partnership’s Energy Collaborative and was the Chairman the past two years during its critical organization and early actions phases. The Energy Collaborative purpose is to perpetuate Greater Houston as the Energy Capital of the world capitalizing …


Greater Houston Partnership
 

Lane Sloan is currently the Vice-chairman of the Greater Houston Partnership’s Energy Collaborative and was the Chairman the past two years during its critical organization and early actions phases. The Energy Collaborative purpose is to perpetuate Greater Houston as the Energy Capital of the world capitalizing on the strengths of Texas. He is also the Special Assistant to the Provost and Director of the University of Houston’s Strategic Energy Alliance, whose mission is to establish UH as a recognized leader locally and globally in energy education,  research and outreach. 



 

Lane spent the last five years as an Executive Professor at the University of Houston’s Bauer College of Business, teaching corporate strategy, strategic leadership and energy leadership courses. He served as the Executive Director of the Global Energy Management Institute helping to make the Bauer College of Business the “energy business school.”

He has also been involved in the Houston Technology Center’s energy sector and sits on the HTC’s Board, its Executive Committee, and the Energy Screening Committee which evaluates energy start-ups. He is active with Legacy Energy Solutions, an outsourced energy management service provider.  Lane also sits on the Petroleum Advisory Board of the Cullen College of Engineering at UH as well as the boards of the Sam Houston Area Boy Scouts, Davidson Instruments, and the Texas Alliance of Energy Producers. He is a Silver Fox Advisor and co-authored a book with Chris Ross entitled Terra Incognita: A Navigation Aid for Energy Leaders , published in April 2007.


Lane joined Shell Oil Company in 1970 and had a twenty nine year + career with a number of executive management positions including becoming the CFO for Shell Oil Company in 1989. In 1993, he undertook an assignment with Royal Dutch/ Shell as Regional Coordinator for the Far East followed by Director of the East Zone in Oil Products. In 1997, Lane was appointed President of Shell Chemical Company. He retired from Shell at the turn of the millennium joining SAIC as Executive Vice President responsible for their Energy Sector. He later became CEO of GrandBasin, a joint venture between SAIC and Halliburton. 


Lane received a BS in Business and an MS in Management Science from the University of Colorado.  From the University of Houston, he received an MS in Accountancy and an MBA in Finance.




Full Description



Organizer

Barry Faulkner


Date and Time

Thu, May 8, 2008

11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
(GMT-0500) US/Central

Event has ended

Location

Petroleum Club, 43 Floor, ExxonMobil Building

800 Bell Street
Houston, Texas 77002
USA