Permian Basin: The Isolation and Formulation of Highly Effective Corrosion Inhibitors from the Waste Product of Hexahydrotriazine-based Hydrogen Sulph

Speaker Grahame Taylor, PH D
Senior Research Scientist Baker Hughes Grahame Taylor gained a BSc and PhD in Organic Chemistry from the University of Reading in the United Kingdom. He worked as a postdoctoral research fellow at the Institute of Cancer Research in London and the Biochemistry Department at the University of Oxford prior to taking ...

Senior Research Scientist
Baker Hughes



Grahame Taylor gained a BSc and PhD in Organic Chemistry from the University of Reading in the United Kingdom. He worked as a postdoctoral research fellow at the Institute of Cancer Research in London and the Biochemistry Department at the University of Oxford prior to taking up a position with Esso Chemicals at Abingdon in the UK. This move into the oil and gas industry also brought with it emigration to the United States. Grahame worked at the Exxon Chemicals', Energy Chemicals Technology Center at HCP, Houston as a synthetic organic chemist in the area of emulsion breakers. Exxon Chemicals formed a joint venture with Nalco's energy services division in 1994 and he moved into Nalco Exxon Energy Chemicals located at the Sugar Land facility. In this position he worked in emulsion breakers, acid corrosion inhibitors, fracturing fluids including  viscoelastic surfactants and biopolymer based fluids. One highlight of this research program was the successful field trial of a new, IP protected emulsion breaker intermediate at Exxon's Santa Ynez unit in California, the largest emulsion breaker account at the time in the lower 48. In 2007 he took a position at BJ Chemical Services as a research scientist and continued to work, primarily as a synthetic organic chemist, in the area of oil field corrosion inhibitors and hydrogen sulphide scavengers. He recently presented two papers at the SPE Oilfield Chemistry Symposium in the Woodlands and todays seminar  covers the work outlined in one of those papers.


Full Description

This presentation describes the isolation and formulation of highly effective corrosion inhibitors from the waste product of hexahydrotriazine based hydrogen sulphide scavengers. Although it has been generally regarded that “spent scavengers are corrosion inhibitors” for some time, this paper uses this generally held belief as a starting point and greatly expands upon this observation. The active species has been identified by analytical methods, isolated from the spent fluid and formulated into highly effective corrosion inhibitors. This is believed to be a unique synergistic chemical recycling process. The application of one chemical product, in its actual operation, acts as a means to chemically synthesize a second chemical in a very highly pure state, such that it can be separated and formulated into a second chemical product, namely a corrosion inhibitor. Analytical data and structural confirmation of the active species are presented together with data to verify its corrosion inhibition properties and also the synergistic formulation of this intermediate to further improve its corrosion inhibition properties. It is believed that this work represents an example of chemical recycling rarely, if ever, seen in our industry.

Organizer Amy Timmons

When?

Tue, Nov. 15, 2011
11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. US/Central

How Much?

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Where?

Courtyard on St James
1885 Saint James Pl
Houston, Texas 77056
USA

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