Sept. 20, 2007


Description

Abstract

Destabilization of completed sandstone reservoirs reduces production rates and degrades production equipment.  A major cause of such destabilization is perforation tunnel failure, which causes sand production.

Classic mechanically-based sand control techniques are effective, but potentially unnecessary for some reservoirs.  Modeling the occurrence and severity of sand production should help identify the most economical pairing of sand control remediation methods with the desired production rate.

This paper examines an advanced technique for modeling such failures, leading to improved drilling and completion practices. In this study, 3D poro-elastoplastic finite element methods are employed to model perforation tunnel stability. Wellbore geometry, reservoir properties, draw-down rate and perforation properties such as tunnel size, spacing and orientation are addressed, with particular attention focused on the transient phenomena near perforations, including stress re-distribution and failure development for different perforations.

The results show that stability of the wellbore and perforation tunnel strongly depends upon drilling and perforation directions and perforation shot density. The relationships of the bottomhole flowing pressure, drawdown, perforation orientation, rock strength and in-situ stresses are given to provide optimal perforation for mitigating sand production.


Featured Speakers

Speaker: Jincai (Jon) Zhang
Speaker Jincai (Jon) Zhang
Sr. Geomechanics Manager Knowledge Systems Jon Zhang, PhD,  is a Senior Geomechanics Manager with Knowledge Systems. Before Knowledge Systems, Jon worked at the University of Colorado, CIRES (Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences), University of Oklahoma Rock Mechanics Institute and the China Coal Research Institute. He has authored over 70 …

Sr. Geomechanics Manager
Knowledge Systems

Jon Zhang, PhD,  is a Senior Geomechanics Manager with Knowledge Systems.


Before Knowledge Systems, Jon worked at the University of Colorado, CIRES (Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences), University of Oklahoma Rock Mechanics Institute and the China Coal Research Institute. He has authored over 70 technical papers, a number of books, and has participated in numerous conferences, presentations, workshops and training courses. Jon has also contributed to industry and academic geomechanics projects worldwide including wellbore stability, casing failure, salt creep, sand production, compaction and subsidence and fracture permeability using both analytical and the finite element/difference method. Jon is a member of the SPE, ARMA and ISRM. He graduated from the University of Oklahoma with a Ph.D. in Petroleum and Geological Engineering, a Master of Science in Rock Mechanics from the China Coal Research Institute, and conducted graduate work in solid mechanics at Tsinghua University and graduate work in hydrogeology and geosciences at China University of Geosciences.

 

 

 

 

 

Full Description



Organizer

David Flores


Date and Time

Thu, Sept. 20, 2007

11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
(GMT-0500) US/Central

Event has ended

Location

Greenspoint Club

16925 NorthChase Dr
Houston, Texas 77060
US