Jan. 25, 2007


Description

Upgridding and Upscaling: What are they and why are they important? Over the last decade, the development of detailed three dimensional geologic descriptions has become common-place within asset and project teams worldwide. During this same period our industry has improved its ability to perform flow simulation on much larger models, but the geologic static models have continued to exceed our computational (flow simulation) capabilities. Upscaling describes the range of techniques used to develop the properties for these coarser, simpler models. Current best practice has moved away from “local” calculations, in which each portion of the reservoir is analyzed in isolation from each other, to “extended-local” and “global” techniques that take advantage of the adjacent portions of the detailed reservoir description to develop more robust effective properties. Upgridding describes the techniques that are used to design the spatial resolution of the coarser model, e.g., the simulation grid. The best upscaled models will retain detailed resolution where necessary and simplify the description where possible. Upgridding guides this variable resolution. Field examples from North America and the North Sea (tight gas and both high and low net-to-gross waterfloods) will be used to demonstrate the power of combining these approaches, giving rise to adaptive calculations that determine the best resolution and the best properties simultaneously. The examples will also demonstrate the powerful emerging trend of performing upscaling within the flow simulator itself, with the static geologic model as input and the spatial resolution for the simulation determined at run-time.


Featured Speakers

Speaker Mike King
BP Mike received his PhD in 1980 from Syracuse University, and joined the oil industry (SOHIO) in 1982 after two years of post-doctoral studies in nuclear and particle physics. His early work involved pore to core scale mechanistic studies, laboratory coreflood and centrifuge analysis, numerical methods, and viscous fingering, both …


BP

Mike received his PhD in 1980 from Syracuse University, and joined the oil industry (SOHIO) in 1982 after two years of post-doctoral studies in nuclear and particle physics. His early work involved pore to core scale mechanistic studies, laboratory coreflood and centrifuge analysis, numerical methods, and viscous fingering, both as an individual contributor and as a team leader. His expertise in heterogeneity modeling and upscaling of geologic models was gained after transferring to the BP laboratory at Sunbury-on-Thames. Since then he has worked as a senior reservoir engineer in BP assets in the North Sea and in North America. He rejoined BP’s Exploration & Production technology group in 1999 during the BP Amoco merger. As a technology network leader, technology Advisor, and R&D project manager he has shaped BP’s global reservoir modeling strategy. He continues active research in this area, with many publications and external presentations.


Full Description



Organizer

Charles Wagner


Date and Time

Thu, Jan. 25, 2007

11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
(GMT-0600) US/Central

Event has ended

Location

Courtyard on St James

1885 St James Place
Houston, TX 77056
USA