Dec. 12, 2006


Description

Multi-zone completions in Tight Gas Reservoirs seriously challenge all conventional attempts to understand the zone-by-zone flow properties.  Core calibrated log analysis identifies matrix reservoir properties and are the basic start to understanding reservoir properties.  However, there are other flow mechanisms such as natural fractures that can have a major impact on the stimulation treatment design and flow potential.

In low permeability reservoirs, traditional buildup tests are just not cost effective often requiring over a month shut-in time to reach pseudoradial flow which is required to determine reservoir properties.  Data Frac Injection Tests (DFIT) are one way to examine each zone in the well as it is being completed and assess the flow potential.  DFIT tests often provide information that cannot be obtained by any other technique regarding the natural fracture contributions to fluid flow.

This presentation will examine case histories in detail to highlight the optimum design and analysis of DFIT tests

Please register early online in order to facilitate the Northside study group to better plan and streamline the luncheon. Walk-ins will be accepted on a space available basis. Please arrive early, walk-ins are seated on a first come/first serve basis. Thank You.


Featured Speakers

Speaker Michael W. Conway, Ph.D.
President STIM-LAB Doctor Conway earned a BS in Pharmacy in 1970 and a MS in Pharmacology in 1971.  In 1978 he earned his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from the University of Oklahoma, Norman.  Concurrently he spent 18 months with the Oklahoma Department of Energy as an Energy Conservation Program Manager.  …

President
STIM-LAB

Doctor Conway earned a BS in Pharmacy in 1970 and a MS in Pharmacology in 1971.  In 1978 he earned his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from the University of Oklahoma, Norman.  Concurrently he spent 18 months with the Oklahoma Department of Energy as an Energy Conservation Program Manager.  In 1978 Mike joined Halliburton Services, Duncan, Oklahoma, in the Fracturing Section.  He was promoted to Stimulation Chemicals Research Group Supervisor and in 1985 became Group Supervisor of Engineering Applications Research.  In 1987 Mike joined STIM-LAB, Inc. as Technical Manager and is now president.


Mike coordinated the consortium of 25 to 30 companies on the rheology and proppant transport of fracturing fluids from the inception of that study group in 1987 until its termination in February 2002.  He worked with Marathon Oil Company on creating a proppant transport module for 3-D frac design model. From 1990 to 1996, under the auspices of GRI, he directed the research efforts in identifying the effects of completion and stimulation fluids on the permeability of coal.


He now coordinates work for the Proppant Conductivity Consortium evaluating the impact of fracturing fluid leakoff, damage on proppant conductivity, impact of multiphase non-Darcy flow on effective conductivity and evaluation of proppant flowback.  He also participates in Integrated Reservoirs Solutions studies. 


Mike has authored over forty papers in various scientific disciplines and is the holder of approximately ten US patents.  He is a co-author on a chapter in the “Recent Advances in Hydraulic Fracturing”.

Full Description



Organizer

Jason Baihly


Date and Time

Tue, Dec. 12, 2006

11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
(GMT-0600) US/Central

Event has ended

Location

Greenspoint Club

16925 Northchase Drive
Houston, TX 77060