Feb. 15, 2006


Description

It is well understood that the key objective of hydraulic fracturing in tight gas reservoirs is the creation of effective fracture length. It is also understood that conventional crosslinked gel fracture stimulations do not necessarily create the desired fracture dimensions. The potential reasons for the shorter than desired fracture lengths are numerous, with the most likely being excessive fracture height growth and poor fracture fluid cleanup.

Reducing net treating pressure with a treated water fracture stimulation may limit height growth. In addition, elimination of polymer by fracture stimulating with treated water may provide more effective, "cleaner" fractures. The use of treated water, with its poorer proppant transport properties, however, may also result in a shorter propped fracture.

This presentation will first present an historical perspective on the use of treated water as a fracturing fluid and high light the risks and rewards associated with its application. Production, geomechanical, and treatment data will be reviewed, and guidelines for the application of the water frac technology will be discussed. These guidelines will provide a means for designing an effective water fracture stimulation which minimizes the risks associated with its use. In addition, several basic questions will be addressed. These include: Do water frac stimulations work? If so, why? If not, why not? And what would I do if it was my well?

Please print and bring credit card receipt if paid on-line.

Featured Speakers

Speaker Larry Britt
NSI Technologies, Inc. Since joining NSI Technologies in 1999, Larry Britt has focused on the development and application of tools for the post-appraisal of hydraulic fracturing stimulations and has managed NSI’s Rock Mechanics Laboratory at the University of Tulsa. Britt’s industry experience includes the optimization, design, and execution of fracture …


NSI Technologies, Inc.

Since joining NSI Technologies in 1999, Larry Britt has focused on the development and application of tools for the post-appraisal of hydraulic fracturing stimulations and has managed NSI’s Rock Mechanics Laboratory at the University of Tulsa. Britt’s industry experience includes the optimization, design, and execution of fracture stimulations and integrated field studies both in the U.S. and abroad. Prior to joining NSI, Larry worked for Amoco Production Company for almost twenty years. During the last seven years with Amoco, he was fracturing team leader at Amoco’s Technology Center in Tulsa, where he was charged with managing the development and application of fracturing technology for Amoco’s worldwide operations. Larry has served as an SPE Distinguished Lecturer on hydraulic fracturing, a JPT editor on hydraulic fracturing, and on numerous SPE forum committees. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri-Rolla and has authored over twenty-five technical papers on reservoir management, pressure transient analysis, and hydraulic fracturing.

Full Description



Organizer

Steve Baumgartner


Date and Time

Wed, Feb. 15, 2006

11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
(GMT-0500) US/Central

Event has ended

Location

The WestLake Club

570 WestLake Park Blvd.
Houston, TX 77079-2603
USA