Nov. 15, 2005


Description

What to do with an old giant oil field which has been produced for almost 80 years?  Put CO2 in it of course.  The Yates field, discovered in 1926, is an uplifted and fractured San Andres carbonate 1,500 to 1,800 ft. below surface.  The original oil in place is estimated at 5 billion bbl.  The field was utilized in 1976 to manage reservoir pressure and control water influx from the aquifer.

Featured Speakers

Speaker Chris Peterson
Sr. Reservoir Engineer Kinder Morgan CO2 Co. LLP Chris Peterson is a senior reservoir engineer with Kinder Morgan CO2 Co. LLP in Midland.  He has worked the SACROC and Yates field since joining  the company in late 2001.  Previously he worked for Texaco Inc. for 19 years.  He began his ...

Sr. Reservoir Engineer
Kinder Morgan CO2 Co. LLP
Chris Peterson is a senior reservoir engineer with Kinder Morgan CO2 Co. LLP in Midland.  He has worked the SACROC and Yates field since joining  the company in late 2001.  Previously he worked for Texaco Inc. for 19 years.  He began his career in the Kern River field in California in the steamfolds as a production, evaluations, and facilities engineer.  In 1990 he moved to Midland to design surface facilities for the Mabee CO2  flood and later worked as a reservoir engineer in the Mabee, Central Vacuum, and Slaughter field CO2  floods.  Peterson has a BS degree in engineering from Harvey Mudd College.

Full Description



Organizer

Steve McCants


Date and Time

Tue, Nov. 15, 2005

11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
(GMT-0500) US/Central

Event has ended

If you do not have a full-time job in the oil and gas industry, are a full-time student or Member in Transition (MiT) member, and you do not see a discounted registration fee for students/MiT regarding this event, please contact the GCS manager at spe-gcs@spe.org.


Location

Westlake Club - Carriage Room

570 Westlake Park Blvd
Houston, TX 77079
USA