Sept. 13, 2005


Description

Understanding the created fracture geometry is key to the effectiveness of any stimulation program. However, almost all predictive models used by reservoir and production engineers to estimate recovery in stimulated wells are based on assumptions that naturally lead to oversimplified fracture geometry.  Several published and unpublished micro-seismic monitoring campaigns reveal that in most cases, hydraulically induced fractures are asymmetric (e.g., one wing of the fracture system is predominantly longer than the other).  This asymmetry is also observed in the vertical plane. This has deep implications on reservoir management. For example, if one knows where most of the depletion occurs (e.g., how does the induced fracture geometry relate to the overall existing drilling and producing field geometry), a production team can improve its infill drilling program and flood to improve production.

Micro-seismic is one of the latest and most accepted technologies allowing reservoir engineers and geoscientists to understand hydraulically induced fractures as well as naturally pre-existing fracture networks in three dimensions.  It uses one or several arrays of sensitive and high-vector fidelity geophones in one or several observation wells at a monitoring distance from the well to be treated. These geophones record the micro-seismic events generated while the formation ruptures during the hydraulic treatment. During the stimulation the micro-seismic events are being recorded along a continuous time-line.  These micro-seismic locations can be determined (as well as other source parameters) and mapped to document how the hydraulically induced fracture system propagates within the pay zone.

Many factors impact the ultimate hydraulically induced fracture system geometry. Understanding this geometry is not only helpful to improve large-scale reservoir management but also to design effective stimulation programs specific to a reservoir.

 

 

Please register early online in order to facilitate the Northside study group to better plan and streamline the luncheon. Walk-ins will be accepted on a space available basis. Please arrive early, walk-ins are seated on a first come/first serve basis. Thank You

 

 

 

 


Featured Speakers

Speaker Kevin Tanner
Senior Production Engineer Schlumberger Mr. Kevin Tanner graduated with a B.Sc. degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Colorado. His post graduate studies in Petroleum Engineering were at the University of Tulsa.  Since joining Schlumberger in 1990 as a field engineer, Mr. Tanner has been based in Alaska, Colorado, ...

Senior Production Engineer
Schlumberger

Mr. Kevin Tanner graduated with a B.Sc. degree in Chemical Engineering from the


University of

Colorado. His post graduate studies in Petroleum Engineering were at the


University of

Tulsa.  Since joining Schlumberger in 1990 as a field engineer, Mr. Tanner has been based in

Alaska,

Colorado,

Texas, and

Wyoming.  Currently, his work focuses on the application of micro-seismic monitoring in relation to production and stimulation engineering.

 



 


 


 


Full Description



Organizer

Jason Baihly


Date and Time

Tue, Sept. 13, 2005

11:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
(GMT-0500) US/Central

Event has ended

If you do not have a full-time job in the oil and gas industry, are a full-time student or Member in Transition (MiT) member, and you do not see a discounted registration fee for students/MiT regarding this event, please contact the GCS manager at spe-gcs@spe.org.


Location

Greenspoint Club

16925 Northchase
Houston, Texas