May 24, 2016


Description

Refracs can be a formidable tool in challenging commodity price environments if proper steps are taken to evaluate the cost benefit. Remedial treatments such as refracs; have long been a tool to generate revenue in the service industry in times like these. We have seen good production improvement in many cases, but without proper due diligence these efforts may not be economic in the current business environment. Remedial production enhancements are not limited to hydraulic fracturing, but include scale and sludge removal as well as artificial lift. This talk will focus on hydraulic fracturing.

Each candidate must be evaluated on a well by well basis to help ensure economic success.

The original hydraulic fracturing treatment and reservoir assumptions must be evaluated prior to any refrac program to understand the cost benefit. In some cases it may be a good idea to embark on a refracturing program to help protect wells from ensuing frac hit from adjacent wells. This will help prevent fracture damage from possible offset well frac hits and aid in frac growth in the child well.

Each refrac program may have a unique set of circumstances that will determine the proper approach.


Featured Speakers

Speaker: James Rodgerson, Completions Advisor, Hydraulic Fracturing, Previously Devon Energy
Speaker James Rodgerson, Completions Advisor, Hydraulic Fracturing, Previously Devon Energy
James is a hydraulic fracturing and completions engineering advisor with over 30 years in Shale stimulation experience and has more than 20 years horizontal stimulation experience. Most recently he has been very active with Devon Energy in their Completions Technology group working with various business units involved with hydraulic fracture ...

James is a hydraulic fracturing and completions engineering advisor with over 30 years in Shale stimulation experience and has more than 20 years horizontal stimulation experience. Most recently he has been very active with Devon Energy in their Completions Technology group working with various business units involved with hydraulic fracture design support, DFIT analysis and DTS/DAS fiber optic implementation and evaluation.


James started his career in the oilfield over 34 years ago with BJ Services. James served at BP from 2012 – 2015. He has authored and co-authored multiple SPE papers and served as Permian Basin Chair and other volunteer roles within SPE. He has served in multiple engineering roles throughout his career, from field to region engineer to research and development. James is a 1980 graduate from Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, College of Engineering, with a BS in Industrial Distribution.

Full Description



Organizer

Amy Timmons


Date and Time

Tue, May 24, 2016

11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
(GMT-0500) US/Central

Event has ended

If you do not have a full-time job in the oil and gas industry, are a full-time student or Member in Transition (MiT) member, and you do not see a discounted registration fee for students/MiT regarding this event, please contact the GCS manager at spe-gcs@spe.org.


Location

Norris Conference Centers - Houston/Westchase

9990 Richmond Ave.
Houston, TX 77042
United States

Parking is complimentary. Any special dietary requests will be met upon request to the event contact.


For additional information please contact SPE-GCS DE SG Chair John Reichardt at john.reichardt@rpsgroup.com or 713-595-5121.



Group(s): Permian Basin