Westside: Dealing with Extreme Variation in Field Reservoir Pressure and Stress when Hydraulically Fracturing an In-fill Horizontal Well

Speaker Dave Cramer, Senior Engineering Fellow, ConocoPhillips
Dave Cramer is a Senior Engineering Fellow with the ConocoPhillips Global Wells Completions Engineering staff in Houston.  He has over 36 years of experience in designing, executing and evaluating well stimulation treatments.  Dave has authored 44 papers and delivered over 175 technical-society presentations on well completion and performance topics, and ...

Dave Cramer is a Senior Engineering Fellow with the ConocoPhillips Global Wells Completions Engineering staff in Houston.  He has over 36 years of experience in designing, executing and evaluating well stimulation treatments.  Dave has authored 44 papers and delivered over 175 technical-society presentations on well completion and performance topics, and is a co-inventor of 2 U.S. patents.  Industry recognitions include the Henry Mattson Technical Achievement Award by the Denver SPE chapter in 1993 and the SPE International Completions Optimization and Technologies Award in 2011.  He was an SPE Distinguished Lecturer in 2003-2004 and the SPE Region Director for the U.S. and Canada Rocky Mountain region in 2004-2007.  Dave is a registered Professional Engineer in the state of Colorado.

Full Description

Well downspacing and in-fill drilling programs are in full swing for many unconventional reservoir plays in the transition to full field development.   However, production or completion activities in offset wells can result in significant variations in pressure and stress within the reservoir, sometimes making it difficult to effectively stimulate the new wells.  Pressure and stress imbalances can lead to highly asymmetrical fracture growth toward the low stress region.  When this happens, hydraulic fracture width is significantly reduced at the junction of the fracture and wellbore. 

This presentation is a case study of an in-fill Barnett Shale well exhibiting anomalous treatment behavior, which included proppant bridging (i.e., screen-out or pressure-out) as 100-mesh sand entered the fractures.  Persistent pressure-out behavior led to terminating the fracturing program and suspending the well after attempting only two fracturing stages.  The root cause of the adverse behavior was diagnosed as extremely variable reservoir pressure and stress, and a field-wide plan was implemented to reduce the pressure and stress imbalance in the vicinity of the problem well.  Then, a remedial treatment plan was implemented, including using viscous fracturing fluid to enhance fracture width at the wellbore in order to facilitate proppant entry.  A large volume of slick water was incorporated as well to enhance far-field fracture complexity.   All nine fracturing stages were pumped to completion as per job design, including restimulation of one of the two previously screened-out treatment stages.  Post-stimulation productivity of the treatment and offset wells was excellent.

 

 

Organizer Andrea Hersey

Telephone 281.646.2805     Email  andrea.hersey@momentive.com

When?

Wed, Feb. 19, 2014
11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. America/Chicago

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Norris Westchase Center
9990 Richmond Ave., Suite 102
Houston, TX 77042

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