R&D Study Group - What can nanotechnology do for the oil and gas industry?

Speaker Dr. Andrew R. Barron
After having gained his BSc and PhD degrees from Imperial College (London) and performing post-doctoral research at the University of Texas at Austin, Barron spent eight years as a Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University before moving to Rice University in 1995 where he is the Charles W. Duncan, Jr. ...

After having gained his BSc and PhD degrees from Imperial College (London) and performing post-doctoral research at the University of Texas at Austin, Barron spent eight years as a Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University before moving to Rice University in 1995 where he is the Charles W. Duncan, Jr. – Welch Chair of Chemistry and Professor of Materials Science. He is also an Honarary Chair of Nanotechnology in the College of Engineering at Swansea University in the UK.


He is the author of over 380 publications, 20 Patents, 5 books, and has graduated 30 PhD students. His early research focused on the chemistry of aluminum and related elements and spanned catalysis, electronic materials and nanotechnology. His current research involves the application of nanotechnology to fundamental problems in energy and health research. His research group has projects involving water purification, down-hole sensors, carbon dioxide mitigation, and cancer treatment.


Prof. Barron is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, and the recipient of several awards, including: Hümboldt Senior Scientist Research Award, the Corday Morgan Medal, the Meldola Medal, and the first Welch Foundation Norman Hackerman Award. In 2009 Barron was appointed as the Prince of Wales Visiting Innovator. In 2011 he won both the Houston Technology Center’s Lifetime Achievement Award in Nanotechnology and the World Technology Award (in Materials).


In addition to teaching in chemistry and materials science, Prof. Barron created the first educational programs at Rice University to span the schools of Science, Engineering and Management. For relaxation Barron races cars, as both an amateur and professional, on both sides of the Atlantic.

Full Description

With changing oil and gas prices, as well as political pressure, there is a need to improve the yield from domestic oil and gas plays. How can nanotechnology accomplish this? One of the challenges with a frac job is enabling the largest volume of the frac to be accessed by the proppant. Using nanotechnology allows for the creation of a lightweight but strong proppant with superior roundness and particle size uniformity. Environmental pressure and legislation are going to be critical factors in water usage for fracing. In particular, the ability to purify, economically, frac and produced water for reuse is a growing need in the US. Nanotechnology, developed as part of an EPA grant, allows for the fabrication of functionalized non-fouling membranes that can accomplish this. Finally, how can you be sure that it is not your frac that is responsible for the claim of damage to the environment? These issues will be discussed in context of technology developed in the Barron research group.

Organizer Skip Davis

Event Contact: Skip Davis, Technology Intermediaries, skdavis@technologyintermediaries.com

When?

Thu, Oct. 3, 2013
11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. America/Chicago

How Much?

A $5 donation for the SPE-GCS Scholarship Fund has automatically been added to the registration fee. Use OptOut in the Discount Code field if you do not wish to donate at this time.
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Where?

Norris Center - Westchase
9990 Richmond Avenue
Houston, Texas 77042

South Building, Suite #102


 

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