Feb. 27, 2003


Description

Mechanical rock properties are becoming increasingly more important in petroleum exploration and production world-wide. An understanding of the stress, strain, and failure mechanics of rocks and their response to earth stresses can lead to enormous economic benefits in all phases of petroleum reservoir development. Over the last ten years, rock mechanics has emerged as a critical technology capable of lowering financial risk in drilling and well completions, qualifying exploration and development opportunities, and improving hydrocarbon productivity. Rock Mechanics in engineering and geoscience applications is a vital decision-making tool for high-angle and horizontal drilling, deepwater drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and completion of poorly cemented formations. Borehole instability, casing shear, subsidence, stuck pipe, and sand control issues cost the petroleum industry many billions of dollars annually. New concepts and improved experimental methods as well as straightforward c
The SPEGCS Reservoir Study Group is very pleased to host a presentation by Mr. Bob Skopec, a 2002-2003 SPE Distinguished Lecturer. This presentation is the same one being given by Mr. Skopec to SPE groups around the world under the aegis of the SPE Distinguished Lecturer program.

Featured Speakers

Speaker




Organizer

Jack Steen


Date and Time

Thu, Feb. 27, 2003

11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
(GMT-0500) US/Central

Event has ended

If you do not have a full-time job in the oil and gas industry, are a full-time student or Member in Transition (MiT) member, and you do not see a discounted registration fee for students/MiT regarding this event, please contact the GCS manager at spe-gcs@spe.org.


Location

Courtyard @ St. James Place, 1885 St. James Place