Oct. 10, 2012


Description

Typical shale well completions involve massive, multistage fracturing in horizontal wells. Aggressive trajectories (with up to 20°/100 ft dog legs), multistage high rate fracturing (up to 20 stages, 100 bpm), and increasing temperature and pressure of shale reservoirs result in large thermal and bending stresses which are critical in the design of production casing. In addition, where cement voids are present and the production casing is not restrained during fracturing, thermal effects can result in magnified load conditions. The resulting loads can be well in excess of those deemed allowable by regular casing design techniques.  These loads are often ignored in standard well design, exposing casing to the risk of failure during multi-stage fracturing.

 

In this work, the major factors influencing normal and special loads on production casing in shale wells are discussed. A method for design and optimization of shale well production casing design is then introduced.  The constraints on the applicability of different design options are discussed.  Load magnification effects of cement voids are described and a method for their evaluation is developed. It is shown that thermal effects during cooling create both bending stress magnification and annular pressure reduction due to fluid contraction in trapped cement voids. This can result in significant loads and new modes of failure that need to be considered in design.  The performance of connections under these loads are also discussed. Examples are provided to illustrate the key concepts described. Finally, acceptable design options for shale well production casing are presented.

 

The results presented here are expected to improve the reliability of shale well designs.  They provide operators with insight into load effects that need to be considered in design of production casing for such wells, and with options for adequate design.


Featured Speakers

Speaker Catherine Sugden and/or Suri Suryanarayana
Blake Energy Partners Catherine Sugden (Senior Technology Development Engineer at Blade Energy Partners) has been working in a professional role in well engineering for over 7 years. Starting at Woodside in Australia, she has worked in supervisory roles in both drilling and completions operations on semi-submersible rigs for big bore ...


Blake Energy Partners




Catherine Sugden (Senior Technology Development Engineer at Blade Energy Partners) has been working in a professional role in well engineering for over 7 years. Starting at Woodside in Australia, she has worked in supervisory roles in both drilling and completions operations on semi-submersible rigs for big bore gas wells. Since joining Blade in 2008, Cathy has been extremely active in HPHT and deepwater well design, often using stochastic techniques to quantify risk and optimize designs. Cathy has lead numerous design and failure investigation studies for shale gas wells. Education credits include a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Tasmania.



 





Suri Suryanarayana (EVP Engineering and R&D at Blade Energy Partners) has eighteen years of professional experience including an extensive background in tubular mechanics, Coiled Tubing technology, multiphase flow modeling and probabilistic design (Quantitative Risk Analysis) techniques. He is currently one of the lead instructors for Blade in their Advanced UBD Well Design and Advanced Casing and Tubing Design courses. Suri is one of the founding partners of Blade Energy and is a member of several organizations including SPE. He has authored or co-authored over 40 archival papers in the industry, and made numerous invited presentations.






Full Description



Organizer

Amy Timmons


Date and Time

Wed, Oct. 10, 2012

11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
(GMT-0500) US/Central

Event has ended

If you do not have a full-time job in the oil and gas industry, are a full-time student or Member in Transition (MiT) member, and you do not see a discounted registration fee for students/MiT regarding this event, please contact the GCS manager at spe-gcs@spe.org.


Location

Petroleum Club of Houston

800 Bell Street
Houston, TX 77002