Oct. 27, 2011


Description

This work provides a roadmap of practice and theory for reservoir and production engineering that can (and should) be used for the description, assessment, and modeling of unconventional gas systems.  There are many substantive engineering challenges which exist and are likely to remain with regard to unconventional gas systems — a sample listing of these challenges include:
 
●"Stimulated Reservoir Volume" (or SRV)?                                            (What is it, really?)
●Role of desorption in shale gas?                                 (Significance? Timing? Relevance?)
●Stimulation fluids?                           (Fluid recovery? Formation damage? Alternatives?)
●Role of natural fractures?                                     (Can this be quantified in gas shales?)
●Dual porosity/dual permeability concept?                                   (Physically consistent?)
 
The proposed workflow constitutes more than simply "best practices," but rather, the means to develop optimal/fit-for-purpose processes and procedures for the engineering aspects of tight gas sands and gas shales.  The application of this approach is demonstrated via anonymous field cases and literature materials/data.
 
As this effort is a "work-in-progress," active participation/ discussion, as well as challenging questions are enthusiastically invited.
 
If you pre-register, but elect to pay at the event, the price will be $45.00.
A limited number of walk-ins ($45) will be accepted, need to be early for on-site registration.

Featured Speakers

Speaker: Thomas A. Blasingame
Speaker Thomas A. Blasingame
Professor of Petroleum Engineering Texas A&M; University Thomas A. Blasingame is a Professor and holder of the Robert L. Whiting Professorship in the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University in College Station Texas.  He holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Texas A&M University — all in Petroleum …

Professor of Petroleum Engineering
Texas A&M University





Thomas A. Blasingame is a Professor and holder of the Robert L. Whiting Professorship in the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University in College Station Texas.  He holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Texas A&M University — all in Petroleum Engineering.  In teaching and research activities, Dr. Blasingame focuses on petrophysics, reservoir engineering, analysis/interpretation of well performance, exploitation of uncon-ventional reservoirs, and technical mathematics.  Dr. Blasingame has made numerous contributions to petroleum technology in pressure transient test analysis, analysis of production data, reservoir management, characterization of reservoir performance, and general reservoir engineering.  To date (September 2011), Dr. Blasingame has graduated 46 M.S. (thesis), 28 M.Eng. (report, non-thesis), and 10 Ph.D. students.  Dr. Blasingame also holds a joint appointment in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at Texas A&M University where he regularly interacts with faculty colleagues and students on the topics of reservoir description, petrophysics, and stratigraphy/sedimentology.


 


Dr. Blasingame is a Distinguished Member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (2000) and he is a recipient of the SPE Distinguished Service Award (2005), the SPE Uren Award (for technology contributions before age 45) (2006), and he has served as an SPE Distinguished Lecturer (2005).  Dr. Blasingame has also received several teaching and service awards from Texas A&M University.


Full Description



Organizer

Chuck Wagner


Date and Time

Thu, Oct. 27, 2011

11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
(GMT-0500) US/Central

Event has ended

Location

Courtyard on St James

1885 Saint James Pl
Houston, Texas 77056
USA