SPEI - Shale Gas Completions, Fracturing, and Production

Speaker George King and Ian Palmer
Apache and Higgs-Palmer Technologies Ian Palmer is a partner of Higgs-Palmer Technologies, and is based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He consults in shale gas, coalbed methane, well completions and production, hydraulic fracturing, sand prediction, compaction/subsidence, and general geomechanics. He was most recently a Geomechanics Specialist with BP in Houston. Before that ...


Apache and Higgs-Palmer Technologies




Ian Palmer is a partner of Higgs-Palmer Technologies, and is based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He consults in shale gas, coalbed methane, well completions and production, hydraulic fracturing, sand prediction, compaction/subsidence, and general geomechanics. He was most recently a Geomechanics Specialist with BP in Houston. Before that he worked many years for Amoco in Tulsa, and shorter times for National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, University of Arizona, Oral Roberts University, and Los Alamos National Laboratories. He was an SPE Distinguished Lecturer in 2001-02. He has published over 100 papers, and over 50 in scientific and technical literature.



His expertise includes: well completions and stimulations (hydraulic fractures, cavity completions); reservoir and wellbore engineering (stress-dependent permeability, matrix shrinkage in coalbed methane); design/analysis/modeling of hydraulic fractures; prediction of sand failure, transport, and management; cavity-like completions in weak sands; rock mechanics; fracture mechanics. He has been a principal of various industry consortia: currently Enhancing Permeability for Tight Reservoirs (11 industry members), and previously Cavity-like Completions in Weak Sands. Ian has a PhD from Adelaide University, Australia.



George E. King is a Registered Professional Engineer with 39 years of oilfield experience. His technical background includes energized fracturing, acidizing, asphaltenes, perforating cleanup, complex formations (North Sea chalk, San Juan coal, heavy/viscous oil, tight gas, Deep Water, and unconventional resources (Tier 1, 2 & 3 Barnett shale completions), sand control, low pressure gas wells and applications work on coiled tubing, perforating, formation damage and workovers.



His technical accomplishments include 60 technical papers, a book on completions and workovers, 1985 SPE Distinguished Lecturer, and 1999 SPE Short Course Lecturer. Industry positions include Technical Chair of 1992 SPE Annual Meeting, API subcommittee chair on perforating, Adjunct Professor at the University of Tulsa (teaching well completions and fracturing), and numerous SPE committees. Awards include the Amoco Vice President’s Award for technology in 1997, API service award in 1994, and the 2004 SPE Production Operations Award.



George worked with Amoco production from 1971 to 1999 and BP from 1999 to 2008, retiring after 37 years, continuing to work in stimulation and production technologies. He is now with Apache, working on technology, shale stimulations, production chemistry and workover operations. He holds a BS in Chemistry from Oklahoma State, a BS in Chemical Engineering. and an MS in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Tulsa.




Full Description
 

Description

This course will acquaint the participants with recent learnings in regard to well completions, fracturing, and production in shale gas reservoirs. Field data and interpretations will be emphasized in an interactive format. Attendees will receive an overview of shale gas technologies, including muti-stage fracturing in horizontal wells, a summary of field data from different shale gas plays, engineering interpretations of field data, and skills for engineering analysis and field deployment of well completions.

Learning
Objectives

Candidate selection criteria and examples of commercial production

  • Recent successful shale gas plays
  • Interplay comparison, and implications
  • What determines EUR
  • Well-by-well variations are huge: what that means, and how to deal with it

Why natural fractures are important

  • Permeability
  • Network (domain) stimulation
  • Statistical variability

Completion design

  • Well orientation and trajectory
  • Completion methods
  • Frac stages and perforating clusters

Well stimulations: how to optimize

  • Role of in-situ stress and geomechanics
  • Diagnostics
  • Different horizontal completions
  • Best horizontal geometries: length, orientation, updip/downdip, simultaneous stimulation
  • Diversion of stimulation fluid, and heterogeneity along well length
  • Design of proppant schedule: sized to fit natural/induced fractures;concentrated to boost gas rate
  • Frac fluid and proppant versus play shaliness

Predicting production

  • How to gauge production success: different indexes
  • Modeling concepts, old and new: complex fracture networks; enhanced perm domains.
  • Sensitivity studies
  • Permeability loss or gain with depletion: compaction of fractures, and matrix shrinkage

Fluid recovery and recycling

  • Flowback rates
  • Recovery techniques
  • Lift
  • Water Recycling

Who Should Attend

Well completion and production engineers, and managers and geologists, working in the area of shale gas.

CEUs

1.6 CEUs (Continuing Education Units) awarded for this 2-day course.

Organizer Cindy Davis

When?

Sat, Oct. 29 - Sun, Oct. 30, 2011
8 a.m. - 5 p.m. US/Mountain

Where?

SPE - Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition
Denver, Colorado
USA

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