Nov. 15, 2011


Description

A small-scale sensing technology can be used inside pipeline maintenance pigs of any size and configuration in order to measure fluid conditions, map pipeline features, and identify potential wall buildup or defects.  The tool can be used in pipelines where conventional in-line-inspection tools cannot traverse, while significantly reducing deployment cost and risk. It can also be used to provide near real-time monitoring of critical pipeline characteristics. The pill-shaped housing containing the sensing elements can collect data on multiple variables, including, but not limited topressure, temperature, 3-axis tilt, and acceleration.  Multiple tests were conducted using the technology mounted onto foam pigs in a 12-inch flow loop with single-phase gas and liquid media. Results from the sensing device consistently identified known bends and wall-thickness changes as small as 0.125 inches.  The sensor pill device was also deployed in a free-floating arrangement without a carrier pig in the flow loop filled with water.  This design enabled the sensing device to travel the length of the line without a pig, thus indicating a potential inspection solution for fully unpiggable pipelines.

Featured Speakers

Speaker Dr. Michael Volk, Jr.
VP of Research and Technology Development The University of Tulsa Dr. Michael Volk, Jr., is the Vice President of Research and Technology Development at The University of Tulsa.  In addition to being the Principal Investigator of the Hydrate JIP, he also serves as Co-Principal Investigator for a Joint Industry Project ...

VP of Research and Technology Development
The University of Tulsa



Dr. Michael Volk, Jr., is the Vice President of Research and Technology Development at The University of Tulsa.  In addition to being the Principal Investigator of the Hydrate JIP, he also serves as Co-Principal Investigator for a Joint Industry Project to investigate Paraffin Deposition in Multiphase Flowlines and Wellbores, and as a Principal Investigator for a Joint Industry Project that seeks to gain an in-depth understanding of the delayed coking process used in refineries.





Before joining the university, Volk worked 20 years in the oil and gas industry for Williams Brothers Process Services, Cities Service Company, NL Industries, Terratek, and Amerada Hess. Volk is a Registered Professional Engineer in the states of Oklahoma and Texas. 



 



Full Description



Organizer

Mark Chapman


Date and Time

Tue, Nov. 15, 2011

11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
(GMT-0500) US/Central

Event has ended

If you do not have a full-time job in the oil and gas industry, are a full-time student or Member in Transition (MiT) member, and you do not see a discounted registration fee for students/MiT regarding this event, please contact the GCS manager at spe-gcs@spe.org.


Location

Greenspoint Club