Permian Basin: Treat and Produce (TAP) Completion System: An Innovative Method to Fracture an Unlimited Number of Zones in a Single Operation

Speaker Paul Jobe
Principle Production Stimulation Engineer Schlumberger Paul has been working in the oil & gas industry since 1986, and for the past 17+ years he has provided expertise in stimulation design and optimization, on-location consulting and technical support, as well as providing detailed evaluation of fracturing treatments using production analysis and ...

Principle Production Stimulation Engineer
Schlumberger



Paul has been working in the oil & gas industry since 1986, and for the past 17+ years he has provided expertise in stimulation design and optimization, on-location consulting and technical support, as well as providing detailed evaluation of fracturing treatments using production analysis and hydraulic fracture modelling.  In 2004 he joined the Oklahoma City Solutions Group as a Production Stimulation Engineer, where he has continued to provide stimulation design and technical support, as well as bringing together multiple facets of geology, petrophysics, and geomechanics to provide complete solutions to clients’ needs.  Since January 2005, Paul's focus has been on completion and stimulation strategies for shale-gas reservoirs, and has been involved in gas-shale completions in almost every major shale-gas basin in the U.S.  In January 2010, he joined Schlumberger’s Completion Segment to bring his reservoir and stimulation experience to the multi-stage fracturing completions market in North America.


Full Description
TAP
 
The Treat And Produce (TAP*) Completion System is an innovative completion method designed to allow a theoretically unlimited number of zones to be fracture stimulated in a single, continuous operation. TAP completions offer benefits including a significant reduction in completion time and cost, and the ability to tap reserves that might otherwise have been
bypassed.
 
When the fracturing process is complete, the well can be produced with the darts in place, each dart having a flow area equivalent to 2 7•8” tubing. If wellbore access is needed for future interventions, such as running production logs, a milling operation can be used to remove the darts, or dissolving darts can be utilized.
Organizer Daniel Tobin

When?

Tue, Feb. 15, 2011
11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. US/Central

How Much?

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Where?

Westlake Club
570 Westlake Park Blvd.
Houston, TX 77079
USA

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