Westside: Proppant Selection and Its Effect on the Results of Fracturing Shales

Speaker John Terracina
Fracturing Technology Manager Momentive Oilfield Technology Group   John Terracina is the Fracturing Technology Manager for Momentive’s (formerly Hexion) Oilfield Technology Group in Houston.  Before joining Momentive, John worked at Halliburton’s Research Center in Duncan, OK for 30 years.  He has 10 patents on fracturing and has written over 30 ...

Fracturing Technology Manager
Momentive Oilfield Technology Group



 


John Terracina is the Fracturing Technology Manager for Momentive’s (formerly Hexion) Oilfield Technology Group in Houston.  Before joining Momentive, John worked at Halliburton’s Research Center in Duncan, OK for 30 years.  He has 10 patents on fracturing and has written over 30 technical papers.  He has been a member of SPE for over 30 years and served as Chairman of the SPE Southwest Oklahoma Chapter.  John is a Technical Editor for SPE’s Editorial Review Committee.  He graduated from Northeast Louisiana University with a B.S. degree in chemistry.


Full Description

Proppant Selection and Its Effect on the Results of Fracturing Treatments

Performed in Shale Formations          

 
Since the introduction of hydraulic fracturing, the industry has been attempting to establish laboratory testing parameters that assist operators and service companies in their effort to select the optimum proppant for a particular field application.  An example of this effort is the development of the “long-term baseline conductivity laboratory test” for proppants.  While this test is a huge leap forward in subjecting proppant to simulated downhole conditions, it still does not adequately address many additional factors that can impact the effectiveness of the proppant such as:
 
a) Proppant fines generation and migration in the fracture
b) Proppant resistance to cyclic stress changes
c) Proppant embedment in the fracture face
d) Proppant flowback and pack rearrangement in the fracture
e) Downhole proppant scaling.
 
Most proppant choices are currently based on which one has the highest baseline conductivity, along with its cost and availability.  While this approach seems logical, it runs the risk of overlooking or under-valuing other critical factors affecting proppant performance in downhole environments.
 
To better define what constitutes the most effective proppant for a particular application, field cases will be presented that focus on the impact of proppant selection in a number of wells completed in various shale formations.  The analysis will examine the production history associated with a variety of proppant choices.  In an effort to better understand the production results, a series of lab tests will be performed on the proppants utilized in the field cases.  These tests will attempt to establish how these factors (such as proppant fines, cyclic stress, embedment, proppant flowback, and scaling) could be used to explain and support the results of the field cases. 
 
Please print and bring credit card receipt if you registered and paid on-line.
 
Please register before the deadline at noon on Monday, February 14th if you plan to attend. Walk-in registrations on the day of the meeting will be accepted for a limited number of seats based on the number of registered attendees or the maximum capacity of the Carriage Room. Thank you
Organizer Alex McCoy

When?

Wed, Feb. 16, 2011
11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. US/Central

How Much?

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Where?

The WestLake Club - Carriage Room
570 Westlake Park Blvd.
Houston, Texas 77079

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