Sept. 21, 2010


Description

Abstract:
 
Cementing is an important step during well construction since the resulting annular cement sheath is expected to provide zonal isolation for the lifetime of the well.
 
A cement slurry is usually pumped from the surface through the casing to the bottom of the borehole and from there into the annular space between casing and formation. Depending on the well conditions (such as depth, temperature, pressure, salinity), various chemical additives (e.g. retarders, dispersants, fluid loss additives) are required to adjust the complex slurry properties.
 
Chemical additive systems have to be carefully designed to provide optimum results within the cement slurry. Additive overloading not only affects economics negatively but also can cause incompatibilities within combinations of additives. This reduces additive effectiveness and can, in the worst case, even lead to complete failure of a cement system.
 
Therefore it is necessary to understand how cement additives work and to develop guidelines for optimum compatibility and more economical use of additives.
 

Mr. Brandl was incorrectly identified as a 2010-11 SPE Distinguished Lecturer in the September 2010 printed SPE-GCS Newsletter.  We apologize for the error.

 

This is a Permian Basin Study Group meeting.

Featured Speakers

Speaker Andreas Brandl
Research Scientist BJ Services Company Andreas Brandl is a research scientist with BJ Services Company in Tomball, TX since March 2009. He started his career with BJ Services in Hambühren (Germany) in 2007 and worked as a cement specialist in Asia Pacific during 2008.   Prior to his positions with …

Research Scientist
BJ Services Company



Andreas Brandl is a research scientist with BJ Services Company in Tomball, TX since March 2009. He started his career with BJ Services in Hambühren (Germany) in 2007 and worked as a cement specialist in Asia Pacific during 2008.



 



Prior to his positions with BJ Services, Brandl was a research associate at the Chair for Construction Chemicals with Professor Johann Plank (Technische Universität München, Germany). As a member of the German Society for Petroleum, Coal Science and Technology (DGMK) as well as the German Chemical Society (GDCh) he worked on several research and industrial projects about cement technology (a.o. cement corrosion in oil and gas wells).



 



Brandl holds a diploma in chemistry and received his doctor of science from the Technische Universität München in 2007. He was honored with the GDCh Award for his dissertation about the working mechanisms and interactions of polymeric additives in oil well cement slurries.



 



Mr. Brandl was incorrectly identified as a 2010-11 SPE Distinguished Lecturer in the September 2010 printed SPE-GCS Newsletter.  We apologize for the error.



 



Full Description



Organizer

Steve Guillot


Date and Time

Tue, Sept. 21, 2010

11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
(GMT-0600) US/Central

Event has ended

Location

WestLake Club

570 Westlake Park Blvd
Houston, Tx 77079
USA