May 19, 2010


Description

Where Does the Salt Come from
in Gas Shale Developments?
  
 
 
High salinity produced fluids are often associated with gas shale developments.  Opinions vary widely regarding the source of the salt, and it is often suggested that “slickwater fracs” are successful in part because they dissolve salts and enhance permeability in the process. 

After extensive measurements of the ion contents in various shales, and an in-depth study of the geological literature, it was observed that there is a consistent, albeit complex series of geological events required to generate a hypersaline environment in the subsurface.
 
This presentation will lead a tour through the geologic record for a typical gas shale reservoir producing high salinity water (Marcellus), and attempt to describe the origin of the ions produced in the hydraulic fracturing treatment flowback water.  These data will be contrasted with another gas shale reservoir that produces basically seawater (Eagle Ford).
 
Please print and bring credit card receipt if you registered and paid on-line.   

Please register before the deadline at noon on Monday, May 17th if you plan to attend.  Walk-in registrations on the day of the meeting will be accepted for a limited number of seats based on the number of registered attendees or the maximum capacity of the Carriage Room.  Thank you

Featured Speakers

Speaker Mike Conway
President Stim-Lab Mike Conway is President of Stim-Lab, a Core Laboratories Company, in Duncan, Oklahoma.  He has over 30 years experience in the areas of hydraulic fracturing, stimulation design, and well performance optimization.  He has directed several joint industry projects and currently conducts the Proppant Conductivity Consortium evaluating the impact …

President
Stim-Lab
Mike Conway is President of Stim-Lab, a Core Laboratories Company, in Duncan, Oklahoma.  He has over 30 years experience in the areas of hydraulic fracturing, stimulation design, and well performance optimization.  He has directed several joint industry projects and currently conducts the Proppant Conductivity Consortium evaluating the impact of fracturing fluid leakoff damage on proppant conductivity, the impact of multiphase non-Darcy flow on effective conductivity, and the evaluation of proppant flowback.  He is also active in Core Lab Integrated Reservoir Solutions studies as the completions engineering lead in the “Tight Gas” and “Shale Gas” consortia.  Mike has BS and MS degrees in pharmacology and a PhD in organic chemistry, all from the University of Oklahoma.  He has authored or co-authored numerous papers in various scientific disciplines and is the holder of ten U.S. patents.      

Full Description



Organizer

Phil Sullivan


Date and Time

Wed, May 19, 2010

11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
(GMT-0500) US/Central

Event has ended

Location

The WestLake Club - Carriage Room

570 WestLake Park Blvd
Houston, Texas 77079