Northside Study Group: Sequestering Carbon Dioxide in a Closed Underground Volume

Speaker Christine A. Ehlig-Economides, Ph.D., M.S., B.A. and Dr. Michael Economides
Professor of Petroleum Engineering Texas A&M University Dr. Ehlig-Economides is currently full professor of petroleum engineering at Texas A&M University in the Albert B. Stevens endowed chair. She founded the Center for Energy, Environment, and Transportation Innovation (CEETI), one of 4 research centers in the Crisman Institute. She has recently ...

Professor of Petroleum Engineering
Texas A&M University

Dr.
Ehlig-Economides is currently full professor of petroleum engineering at Texas A&M
University
in the Albert
B. Stevens endowed chair. She founded the Center for Energy, Environment, and
Transportation Innovation (CEETI), one of 4 research centers in the Crisman
Institute. She has recently prepared an academic program proposal in Energy
Engineering that will offer MS and PhD degrees. She is a member of the National
Academy of Engineering and was a member of the National Academy of Science
America’s Energy Future Committee.

 

Christine Ehlig-Economides received a B.A. degree in
math-science from Rice an M.S. degree in chemical engineering from the
University of Kansas, and a Ph.D. degree in petroleum engineering from Stanford University
. Dr. Ehlig-Economides has
received numerous awards from the Society of Petroleum Engineers.

 
Dr. Michael Economides is a chemical and petroleum engineer and an expert on
energy geopolitics he holds a number of positions such as professor at the
Cullen College of Engineering, University of Houston, Chairman of the Board of
XGAS, a natural gas firm (www.xgas.us
) and Managing
Partner of Dr. Michael J. Economides Consultants, Inc. with a wide range of
industrial consulting, including major retainers by several Fortune 500
companies and national oil companies, Editor-in-Chief of
Energy Tribune (www.energytribune.com)
a newsletter in the energy and related industries and activities and Editor-in-Chief
of the peer-reviewed Journal of Natural
Gas Science and Engineering
, published by Elsevier.
 

Full Description

The capture and subsequent geologic sequestration of CO2 has been central to plans for managing CO2 produced by the combustion of fossil fuels. The magnitude of the task is overwhelming in both physical needs and cost, and it entails several components including capture, gathering and injection. The rate of injection per well and the cumulative volume of injection in a particular geologic formation are critical elements of the process.

Published reports on the potential for sequestration fail to address the necessity of storing CO2 in a closed system. Our calculations suggest that the volume of liquid or supercritical CO2 to be disposed cannot exceed more than about 1% of pore space. This will require from 5 to 20 times more underground reservoir volume than has been envisioned by many, and it renders geologic sequestration of CO2 a profoundly non-feasible option for the management of CO2 emissions.

Material balance modeling shows that CO2 injection in the liquid stage (larger mass) obeys an analog of the single-phase, liquid material balance, long-established in the petroleum industry for forecasting undersaturated oil recovery. The total volume that can be stored is a function of the initial reservoir pressure, the fracturing pressure of the formation or an adjoining layer, and CO2 and water compressibility and mobility values.

Further, published injection rates, based on displacement mechanisms assuming open aquifer conditions are totally erroneous because they fail to reconcile the fundamental difference between steady state, where the injection rate is constant, and pseudo-steady state where the injection rate will undergo exponential decline if the injection pressure exceeds an allowable value. A limited aquifer indicates a far larger number of required injection wells for a given mass of CO2 to be sequestered and/or a far larger reservoir volume than the former. 

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Thank you.
 
Parking: Use Contract Entrance. Push button on kiosk and tell security that you are with the SPE Northside Study Group in the Greenspoint Club.
Organizer Bernard Franklin

When?

Tue, Apr. 13, 2010
11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. US/Central

How Much?

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Where?

Greenspoint Club
16925 Northchase Dr.
Houston, TX 77060

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