Permian Basin: Weak Acid Stimulates the San Andres

Speaker Steven Metcalf
Permian Basin Region Technical Manager BJ Services in Midland, Tx Mr. Metcalf is the Permian Basin Region Technical Manager for BJ Services in Midland, Tx.  He received a Bachelors Degree from Emporia State University in Chemistry in 1972 and a Masters Degree from Kansa State University in Physical Chemistry in ...

Permian Basin Region Technical Manager
BJ Services in Midland, Tx

Mr. Metcalf is the Permian Basin Region Technical Manager for BJ Services in Midland, Tx.  He received a Bachelors Degree from Emporia State University in Chemistry in 1972 and a Masters Degree from Kansa State University in Physical Chemistry in 1975.  He is a Registered Professional Petroleum Engineer in the State of Oklahoma since 1988.  He has worked in the petroleum industry for over 34 years for both service and operating companies in Texas and Oklahoma and has held various research and engineering positions.  He is a member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers  since 1977 and has co-authored several papers in the areas of cementing, acidizing and fracturing.

Full Description

Carbonate formations are predominant in the Permian Basin and as such are commonly stimulated with acid. Repeated stimulation is typically required to maintain production over the life of the well, but each successive treatment increases the surface area exposed to the acid. Therefore, subsequent treatments of the same acid volume and strength will tend to spend a shorter distance from the wellbore, and production improvements will be moderate. Increasing acid volumes to overcome this problem is typically uneconomic. Instead, use of weak acid has been shown to improve production in over-stimulated reservoirs, by penetrating more deeply into the formation—beyond the large surface area of already-treated rock—before spending itself. To test this concept, slow-reaction acetic acid was used to stimulate 13 mature San Andres wells that had been acidized several times previously, with ever-diminishing response. Production increases of over more than 100% were achieved in three study areas with minimal change in water cut.

Organizer Steve Guillot

When?

Tue, Jan. 19, 2010
11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. US/Central

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Where?

Westlake Club
570 Westlkae Park Blvd.
Houston, TX 77079

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