S&E: Workers' Health & Safety (Health Risk and Impact Assessments)

Speaker Julie McCashin, MPH
VP, Health Services Development International SOS Assistance, Inc. Julie McCashin is Vice President, Health Services Development for International SOS. She has worked in international medical assistance since 1986 and is trained in Public Health. She has worked on malaria, HIV and TB control programs at the employee health level and ...

VP, Health Services Development International SOS Assistance, Inc.


Julie McCashin is Vice President, Health Services Development for International SOS. She has worked in international medical assistance since 1986 and is trained in Public Health. She has worked on malaria, HIV and TB control programs at the employee health level and in support of community-based programs. Recently she has focused on developing health care management programs for national employees in Africa.


 


Julie has developed health plans for major infrastructure projects in Asia, Africa and the CIS. She has written pandemic preparedness plans for several major corporations. Julie has a Masters of Public Health from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and an MBA from George Washington University. She is fluent in French and Spanish and has worked extensively in Latin America.


 


Her professional interests include corporate sponsored community health initiatives, the corporate role in sustainable development and developing international occupational health programs.   

Full Description

For HSE managers, there is a tremendous focus on keeping the workforce safe and healthy.  Most are well aware of the challenges of operating in remote and underdeveloped and areas and routinely conduct health risk assessments and implement mitigation measures to ensure they can address the health needs of the workforce under these difficult circumstances.  This talk will ask the audience to shift their focus and consider how the projects we bring to these areas can impact the health of communities where we are working.  This is a standard practice in the environmental area where EIAs are mandatory for most projects.   Health Impact Assessments are just beginning to be incorporated into project planning. Though we may not always be aware of it, our activities can potentially have a significant impact, both positive and negative on those living near the project and sometimes the impact can be even further reaching.  We may impact the food sources available and change the nutritional status of the population.  We worry about the infectious disease risks we face when operating in new areas but projects can introduce disease to the populations as well, examples include malaria, chicken pox, dengue and HIV.  It is important to consider these impacts early and plan how best to mitigate them.  Conversely, the project can bring economic development which can result in improvements in local medical resources and we should look at how these positive impacts can be harnessed and maximized. 

 

Organizer Christa Henager