SPE R&D Study Group - Water related issues in drilling and production of gas and oil, 2014

Speaker Dr. Mason Tomson, Rice University
Professor Mason Tomson holds a BS degree in Chemistry and Mathematics and a Ph.D. in Chemistry and is a licensed professional engineer (P.E.) He is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Rice University, Houston, TX.  He has coauthored over 250 articles in high impact journals, including Science, Journal ...

Professor Mason Tomson holds a BS degree in Chemistry and Mathematics and a Ph.D. in Chemistry and is a licensed professional engineer (P.E.) He is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Rice University, Houston, TX.  He has coauthored over 250 articles in high impact journals, including Science, Journal of the American Chemical Society, Environmental Science and Technology, Oil and Gas Journal, and numerous SPE journals; he holds four patents, and has authored two books. While at Rice, he has directed research grants totaling over twenty million dollars. He is presently involved in numerous research projects from DOE, Advanced Energy Consortium, Brine Chemistry Consortium of twenty six oil and gas production and service companies (about 25 yrs.), and shale gas water treatment. Prof. Tomson is also leading a joint program between Rice University and Nankai University (Tianjin, China) on sustainable environmental development and several energy/environment related projects.  In collaboration with Prof. Colvin his work on arsenic removal was named one of the top five nanotech breakthroughs of 2006 by Forbes magazine and was featured in New York Times.

Full Description

It takes around 120,000 bbl of water to hydraulically fracture a well and the well will return from 10 to 20% of the water, but in a greatly degraded form.  On average, a conventional producing well produce from 7 to 10 barrels of water for each barrel of oil, or equivalent; this water tends to be corrosive, scaling, and loaded with “chemicals of concern” from simple salt to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons.  The challenges are several fold, first there is a great need for more useable water for fracing, or to learn to tolerate lower quality water.  Second, as the water is produced there are numerous engineering issues that must be managed related to keeping the well bore functioning.  Finally, the produced water must be disposed of or reclaimed for use.  Often the temperatures, pressures and salt content with the produced waters exceed our technical ability to model or treat.  It is imperative that water handling technology be improved, or the industry will continue to lose revenue and stop production prematurely.

Organizer Skip Davis

Skip Davis, Chair R&D Study Group, skdavis@technologyintermediaries.com




 


 

 

When?

Thu, Jun. 5, 2014
11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. America/Chicago

How Much?

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Where?

Norris Center - Westchase
9990 Richmond Avenue - Suite 102
Houston, Texas 77042
United States

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