March 17, 2010


Description

            Capturing By-Passed Pay 

Pay is the thickness of a reservoir rock that contains significant quantities of potentially exploitable hydrocarbons.  By-passed pay relates to movable hydrocarbons that cannot be drained by existing wells and will be left in place if nothing is done.  By-passed pay can occur at wells or between wells. In the former case it might literally have been overlooked at the time that the well was drilled and completed.  This might have happened because the pay was “hidden”, as for the infamous low resistivity pay, or perhaps because the hydrocarbon was gas, for which there was no ready market at the time. In between wells, integrated reservoir studies can show that reservoir zones or layers have been left untapped during field production.  This might have happened because of a preferential watering out or because discrete sand channels were not intersected by a wellbore. 

 

This presentation looks at diverse examples of by-passed pay and summarizes the approaches that are being used to capture them.  By-passed pay constitutes a lower-risk prospect than hydrocarbon accumulations in unappraised areas.  Beyond this, there are three drivers.  First, new technology in the form of improved reservoir imaging allows insights that were not achievable previously.  Second, an evolving understanding of how reservoirs work has allowed procedures to be developed for maximizing the exploitation of even problematic accumulations.  Third, market forces amid global post-peak-production fears are giving the exploitation of by-passed pay an even greater impetus today.  Some pointers are identified as an aid to maximizing commercially recoverable hydrocarbons in developed assets. 

 
 
 
Please print and bring credit card receipt if you registered and paid on-line. 
 
Please register before the deadline at noon on Monday, March 15th if you plan to attend.  Walk-in registrations on the day of the meeting will be accepted for a limited number of seats based on the number of registered attendees or the maximum capacity of the Carriage Room. 
Thank you

Featured Speakers

Speaker Paul Worthington
Gaffney, Cline & Associates Principal Adviser Paul F. Worthington is a Principal Adviser with Gaffney, Cline & Associates in Singapore, where his main interests are integrated reservoir studies for equity redetermination, reserves estimation, and reservoir management.  Previously he spent 13 years with BP, mostly as Head of Formation Evaluation at …

Gaffney, Cline & Associates
Principal Adviser
Paul F. Worthington is a Principal Adviser with Gaffney, Cline & Associates in Singapore, where his main interests are integrated reservoir studies for equity redetermination, reserves estimation, and reservoir management.  Previously he spent 13 years with BP, mostly as Head of Formation Evaluation at the BP Research Center in Sunbury-on-Thames, England.  He has a PhD and a DEng, both from the University of Birmingham, UK and has published over 90 technical papers in the field of engineering geoscience.  Worthington currently holds a visiting professorship in Petroleum Geoscience and Engineering at Imperial College, University of London.  He has served as President of SPWLA, a Distinguished Lecturer of SPE and SPWLA and has twice chaired the SPE Formation Evaluation Committee.  Worthington is a member of the SPE Distinguished Lecturer Committee and is Program Chair for HEES 2010.  He is a former Editor of Petrophysics and is currently a Co-editor of Petroleum Geoscience.

Full Description



Organizer

Phil Sullivan


Date and Time

Wed, March 17, 2010

11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
(GMT-0500) US/Central

Event has ended

Location

The WestLake Club - Carriage Room

570 WestLake Park Blvd
Houston, Texas 77079